School of Humanities

Pragmatics I

This course is part of the programme:
Master in SL studies - Linguistics

Objectives and competences

  • Students are introduced to classical and modern achievements in pragmatic theories regarding language use.
  • The course allows students to appreciate the division of labor between semantics and pragmatics and acquire a formal tool to analyze pragmatic meaning.

Prerequisites

The subject is related to the rest of the linguistic classes in this program.

Content (Syllabus outline)

This course discusses the main types of pragmatic phenomena and outlines the domain of theorizing in current Pragmatic theory. It introduces students into the classical Gricean theory of language use and leads them into the modern neo-Gricean developments of formal pragmatics while juxtaposing these to the advances in Relevance theory.

Intended learning outcomes

Students are acquinted with and can critically evaluate classical and current theories on the following pragmatic topics:

Gricean theory of language use;

conversational implicatures;

Relevance theory;

scalar implicatures and neo-Gricean developments;

conventional implicatures;

implicature projection;

advances in experimental pragmatics.

Readings

Kadmon, Nirit. 2001. Formal Pragmatics: Semantics, Pragmatics, Presupposition, and Focus.

Oxford: Blackwell Publishers.

Levinson, S. 1983. Pragmatics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Levinson, S. 2000. Presumptive meanings: The theory of generalized conversational implicature. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Sperber, D. in D. Wilson. (2004) “Relevance Theory” v G. Ward and L. Horn (ur.) Handbook of Pragmatics. Oxford: Blackwell, 607-632.

Potts, Christopher. 2005. The Logic of Conventional Implicatures: Oxford Studies in Theoretical Linguistics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Assessment

  • attendance and active class participation; • two homework assignments; • final written exam.

Lecturer's references

Associate professor of Linguistics at the University of Nova Gorica.

STEPANOV, Arthur, STATEVA, Penka. When QR disobeys superiority. Linguistic inquiry, ISSN 0024-3892, 2009, vol. 40, no. 1, str. 176-185. [COBISS.SI-ID 1130491]

STEPANOV, Arthur, STATEVA, Penka. Successive cyclicity as residual wh-scope marking. Lingua, ISSN 0024-3841. [Print ed.], dec. 2006, vol. 116, no. 12, str. 2107-2153.

STATEVA, Penka. On the status of parasitic gaps in Bulgarian. Journal of Slavic linguistics, ISSN 1068-2090, 2005, vol. 13, no. 1, str. 137-155. [COBISS.SI-ID 1154811]

STATEVA, Penka. Possessive clitics and the structure of nominal expressions. Lingua, ISSN 0024-3841. [Print ed.], Aug. 2002, vol. 112, no. 8, str. 647-690, doi: 10.1016/S0024-3841(01)00066-3. [COBISS.SI-ID 1150203]

University course code: 2SL2040

Year of study: 1

Course principal:

Lecturer:

ECTS: 3

Workload:

  • Lectures: 30 hours
  • Individual work: 60 hours

Course type: mandatory

Learning and teaching methods:
• lectures; • participation in discussions at tutorials; • homework assignments.